Thanksgiving Tips for Busy Families (plus silly bloopers)

Are You Ready?

Thanksgiving is almost here in the U.S.  Some dread it; some can’t wait. We keep it low key, so I am grateful for that.  Heck, we don’t even have a dining room table since the move, so this year should be interesting.  Regardless of the set-up, some families have hectic holidays.  That’s why it’s critical to plan and prepare … especially if you share a home with the furry, feathered, or scaly kind. 

This short post is dedicated to those of you out there who could use a few tips for Thanksgiving to be less hectic and more harmonic. 


In our household, 365 days a year, we do our best to help every animal to feel safe and secure.  We continue to counter condition and desensitize animal to their individual perceived threats. We practice energy management. We strive to set them all up for success.  We use tools and techniques to ensure their perceived “threat level” is at zero.  We respect boundaries, believe in consent, and factor in FUN! 

But these are only pieces of the peaceful puzzle.

Boundaries, Please.

Creating safe boundaries is an essential key to creating peace and harmony in your home, especially during and after stressful holiday festivities.  If you have children, guide them by showing them how to to respect the animal’s space or enclosure.  Teach them to be mindful and respectful of each individual animal’s tolerance for noise and commotion.   Ensure that our animal companions have their own safe bubble where they are free from being “loved on” (AKA being pestered).  If you have family or friends visiting, remind them to give the animals space.

King Albert and Mr. Beaux sharing warm sunny spot, enjoying peace

Consider “Consent”.

▪️How do you feel when a friend, family member or stranger touches you without your consent?
▪️How would you react if someone whom you’re sometimes uncomfortable with started stroking or rubbing on you without your permission?
▪️How would you feel if a stranger touched your face, or another area few go near?

Just reading those questions made you uncomfortable, didn’t it❓

🔸Many animal companions experience this daily.  They tolerate the uninvited touches, the cuddling without consent, and the petting without permission.  Imagine being an animal companion who experiences this multiple times a day every day, for years.  Then consider how challenging that could be if you were an animal companion who has a underlying medical conditions, fears, and challenges with close-encounters.

Choice Matters, But There’s More to It.

If the animals choose to be around your guests, remember that the dog or cat may be excited to see newcomers, but in the next instant they very well could be more protective of things they consider “high value” such as bedding, treats, their people, and their food.  Remember those stress hormones are in their system!

Sharing Space Momentarily or Best Buds? There’s a Big Difference!

Also, if the animals in your home are not the best of buds, and they’re merely coexisting with one another, creating safe spaces for each animal and managing your home environment carefully is imperative. Give everyone ample safe space!

Being aware of each animal’s individual threshold, and their need for safe, quiet refuge after any kind of commotion is how we become conscious companions for the animals with which we share a home. 

Despite what we often may think, animals are pretty complex creatures. They speak a different language than we do, they have quirks in their personalities that can make them quite unusual sometimes (like us humans) and they often display anxiety and discomfort in ways we don’t.

Over the years we have observed each animal in our home respond with a different type of reactivity to their individual perceived threats. The dog has been known to lunge and bark, freeze and growl, or retreat. Her response depended on what she felt threatened by, and by her individual stress/hormone levels at that moment.

Cortisol is an adrenal hormone with a great number of effects on the body. The level goes up or down quickly in response to stress.

Each of the cats has their own individual response, depending on the trigger at the time, and their individual stress hormone levels. You might recall one of your animals behaving this way when they are stressed. You might even recall doing this yourself!

That’s why we set everyone up for success!

Cooking with kids and canines — setting everyone up for success! (image from Family Paws Parent Education)


                       Holiday Tips for Busy Families

Check out the video below (filled with bloopers).  I made this a couple of years ago, but the points are timeless.  This will give you some giggles, insight, and ideas on how you can prepare your entire family for a Thanksgiving Feast, and how to enjoy the Family Festivities in Harmony!

Remember to Laugh, But Focus on Prevention!

Although I included some silly bloopers in this video, the points I address are very important.  Please consider the needs of everyone in your home. Please plan ahead and prepare. And remember that your energy and attitude is contagious!

Hocus Pocus Loves Pumpkin Pie, but we make sure she’s not tempted by offering her more appropriate thanksgiving goodies 😉

P.S. Be sure to check out the articles and videos at the end of this post; all are related to what I discuss in this video!

“I am who I am today because of the mistakes I made yesterday.”

― The Prolific Penman



Becoming a Conscious Companion

If you are reading this, I can assume that you love the animals that you share your life with enough to be inspired or learn more to improve their lives.  I encourage you to take that love and funnel it into educating yourself, and your family and friends about the basic behavior of the species that you work with, live with, and adore.  Every day I challenge myself to learn something new about the animals I love and live with.  I hope you do the same. 

You can discover tons of free resources at our website!

Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity. It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend.


Recommended Videos // Related Reading

Enrichment is one of your most empowering tools!

Enrichment at Home Serves To:

Learn more here!

The Never Ending (Moving) Story

“When efforts that are wisely executed, the situation and condition don’t affect the performance.” ― A.Patel

road-trip with pets
The long road less traveled on our Big Move with the Animal Menagerie

We have arrived in California!  Finally.  1.1 humans, 3.0 felines, 0.1 canine, 0.0.8 plants, and 0.0.2 vehicles  made it safely from the east coast to the west coast!  It only took us a MONTH to move out of our home in VA, drive across the country, and move into our home here in Cali, but we are here. And everyone is doing very well.

We must have had Falkor with us in spirit on our move out here because we had a lot of luck, magic, and miracles along the road less traveled.  We also had a lot of patience, gratitude, and very successful animal menagerie management tools and techniques at play.

unnamed (10)

 

This is going to be a quick post, because we have been going nonstop since we got here, and we still have much more to do.  But I wanted to at least update my readers because you are dear to me.  Plus with all that is going down in the world, I wanted to share some Love Light.


I Proved Myself Wrong – In the Best Way Possible

I don’t like to prove others (or myself) wrong, but here goes.  Do you remember how scared I was about the move?  Did you read the post about how I was allowing ALL my fears to take over all of my perceptions of what would happen?  Well, that was a huge waste of energy. None of that happened.

But some other major mishaps did happen.

Here’s the abbreviated Bad News from our laborious move out West:

  • The moving company packed up our household goods (everything) out of our home, then moved it all into storage (unbeknownst to us for several weeks).
  • I lost my voice on Day One of The Drive. Then that evening I had full blown flu-like symptoms.
  • Knox Zydeco decided that riding in a car was no longer an option for him anymore. In fact, it was one of the most terrifying experiences of his life (We discovered this within minutes of leaving our temporary hotel in VA and setting out on the road.)
  • Albert managed to escape from a 4 inch gap in my car window and walk around my family’s cemetery while I was paying respects.
  • One of our cars broke down at 10:30 at night while driving through the Texas desert.
  • We lived out of 8 different hotels across the country for 24 days.
  • Once we arrived in Cali the movers took another 8 days to get here so we stayed in another hotel for a week.

Good times.

But that’s not where the seemingly never-ending moving story ends. There’s more. If you have been following this blog, then you know that I always focus on the positive in life and especially with our animal companions.  

So… Here’s the abbreviated GOOD News from our Big Move:

  • Our feline veterinarian was absolutely incredible at immediately responding to and diagnosing Knox’s Full-On-Freak-Out while we were in transit.
  • We now know how incredibly helpful (and safe) the right medications can be for fearful cats. And we learned that these are the same meds that people are prescribed for panic attacks and anxiety! (more to come on this important topic ).
  • I learned why one should never have a deep healing acupuncture session prior to moving across country (hence the flu-like symptoms).
  • Hocus Pocus had zero aggression, frustration or fear reactivity issues. I am so proud of her!
  • Our senior kitty boys were total rock stars; Beaux and Albert both did exceptionally well on the long 11 hour drives each day. And King Albert’s health challenges did not cause him any noticeable duress.
  • I was able to  visit my Cherokee ancestors’ royalty resting grounds (while Albert was busy escaping and roaming around the cemetery).
  • The animals were incredibly tolerant, patient, and calm in the many hotels, long road days, and with me being unwell the entire time.
  • There were no spats or fights (between the people or pets)! Not even a single swat or hiss.
  • There was only one (appropriate) growl from Hocus the ENTIRE time. (I will talk about close-quarter management techniques in another post.)
  • None of the animals became injured, lost, sick, or any other horrible scenario I had imagined. (Although, Albert was a close call).
  • My animal communication skills were put to the test and I passed with flying colors.
  • We all grew closer together during this trial.
  • Everyone did exceptionally well, considering how hard it was on all of us for such a long time.
  • They have all settled into our new home and are far exceeding what I thought they were capable of.
  • Everyone is thriving!

anything is possible_nothing is impossible

 

It’s All Been Worth the Time and Effort!

All of the techniques, tools, and behavior modification methods I have learned over the years of being an animal trainer, pet parent, and animal behavior consultant came into play during this long transition.  The methods I share with you and use with my clients were all put to the test.  Including some I had never tried before!  They were such a huge success.

All of my efforts have paid off.  What I thought was impossible was possible.  I didn’t believe the cats or canine were capable of coping.  I had anticipated the worst, but each of them found their way to SHINE during a very difficult and long process.  Each of them adjusted, adapted, and   They proved all of us wrong.  They were total champs.  At times they even seemed to understand that we were all in this together.

I am still in awe of them.  Conscious Companion 2016 Road trip

But that’s all I am going to write about for now.  In the near future I will be sharing with you how I was able to create and maintain safety, peace, and harmony during the Long Haul with each of the animals. I will also share how we have been able to help each of them to settle into our new dojo with flying colors (and with no flying fur!).  I can’t wait to tell you all about everything that’s working, and the new tools I have discovered. These tips and techniques will make such a huge difference for you and your companion animals.


Success is the sum of small efforts, repeated day in and day out.-Robert Collier


In Other News

I hope those of you in the U.S. and Canada enjoyed (and survived) the recent independence holidays. We are still experiencing bomb-like-fireworks nightly here, so we are continuing to help the animals cope with that.  If you need some suggestions to help your pets with post-Independence day celebrations, check out this post and this one as well.

If you were affected by the tragic events in Orlando (my hometown), my heart goes out to you.  Our friends and family still live there, so this really hit home for us. My mother was able to send her team of therapy dogs to help the first responders from that event. You can read about that here.   Now they are visiting with the Orlando community as their team is able, helping so many to heal.

Also, if you or anyone you know are either a HSP or an Empath, this Instagram page might be helpful.  As we move forward in the world, and as I continue to share here, I will spread as much love and light as I can.  With all of the drama, anger, and sadness we are witnessing unfolding in the world right now, we need more love.  We must uplift and love one another. When the world appears dark, we need to be The Light.  Remember that our animal companions are such perfect teachers for this.  They are pure unconditional love.

“There are darknesses in life and there are lights, and you are one of the lights, the light of all lights.” ― Bram Stoker, Dracula


OH! Before I go, I wanted to share one more inspiring thing with you.  Here’s the view from our new backyard.  Gah! Can you smell the salt air and feel the sand between your toes??

unnamed

Well, I am off the watch tonight’s sunset. So Much love to you and yours!


“May it be a light to you in dark places, when all other lights go out.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Don’t Wait. It may be too late.

 Appreciation is a wonderful thing. It makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well.― Voltaire

Suneset shoreline

Two of our friends died suddenly and tragically on Mother’s Day.  It has been a shock to everyone who knew them.  They left behind countless friends and family, and their beloved rescued canine companion.

We are all mourning in our own way. We are all feeling the effects of this tragedy differently; some inwardly and some outwardly.  My grief comes and goes in waves.  My husband on the other hand, shares it all, bares it all, and makes no apologies or excuse for what he’s feeling.  He laughs when he needs to, and cries when he’s moved.

He is the one who brought something to light for me during all of this.

We had both been gone when we heard the horrible news.  When we returned home we went out for a bite to eat, to get some perspective and discuss the details of what we knew about the tragedy.  Something he said at dinner resonated with me, and keeps coming back into my awareness:  “You know, when I first heard the news, all I could think was NO NO NO NO NO that’s impossible. Then my mind quickly switched to feeling an overwhelming sadness at the fact that I can never tell him all of the things I want to tell him.  All of the things I should have said.  I have so much I want to tell him.”

That hit me hard.  My husband was right.  That chance is gone.  Game over.  They are both gone.

You may be wondering, Why are you sharing this with me?  How does this have to do with our companion animals? 

 I am sharing this with you because life is precious, and the ones we love could be gone in an instant.

Life is dear and too short to put off sharing our thoughts, feelings, and gratitude for the ones we love, the ones that make us laugh, and even the ones that push our buttons.   This includes the animals we have in our lives; the ones we care for at a facility, shelter, or in our home.

Those annoying behaviors or frustrating personality traits (whether friend, family, or pet) instantly disappear when their life is extinguished.  All we see is their beauty and their light.  All we remember is the best of them.

So why aren’t we seeing the best in the animals and people we love that are still alive?

It’s easy to complain or become annoyed with the people we love, the family and friends that drive us nuts, and the coworkers that we could do without.  But understand this: no matter who they are, or what they represent to you, they are in your life for a reason, and their presence matters.  The animals that we care for at home or work are in our life are also there for a reason.  Even when they make things more difficult or frustrating at times, they still add value to our lives.  Look for that value.  Look for a reason, for each of them.  I promise you, if you look hard enough, you’ll see their value and their individual worth.

Every soul in our lives is a gift.  They are either a teacher, a mentor, or someone you are teaching and mentoring. Every person, animal, and circumstance in our lives can be a great teacher.  There are countless lessons to be learned by all of them.

I am grateful beyond words for every teacher in my life.  Many of them came in forms that I would not have chosen, but lessons were learned because of them.  Two of my animal companions are currently teaching me lessons that I would rather not learn at the moment, but I have to remind myself to thank them for being in my life. Their presence is invaluable.

Who we love, and who we care about need to hear it.   Every day.  Tell the ones you love how much you appreciate them, how much you value their presence in your life, and how their life has affected yours.  Look past those annoying traits, and the buttons they seem to push in you.  Laugh at it.  Blow it off.  See them for who they really are. Look beyond the surface to see the best in them.

Appreciate them. Thank them.  Spend time with them.  Shower them with love.  Tell them how you feel, even if it’s a tough truth to be told; be humbly and graciously honest.  Be kind.

That’s love.  That’s living life to the fullest. That’s how we make life meaningful.  That’s how life becomes a miracle.  Don’t wait.  Show them, and tell them now.

heart-with-hands_gratitude

 At the end of the day, let there be no excuses, no explanations, no regrets. ― Steve Maraboli, Life, the Truth, and Being Free

From Cat-Nappings to Trusted Travels!

how to get my cat to the vet
King Albert The Grey carefully checking out the cat carrier

Traveling with your cat doesn’t have to be a crazy, stressful experience. It can, and should, be a stress-free even for both of you!  You can take trips together, and you go to the vet when needed, without having to catnap your cat.

Below are some tips and techniques that I have had success with over the years, with wild and domestic felines.  I hope these tips can help you and your feline family members, too!   Please note: this is an abbreviated list. If you would like more detailed help, feel free to contact me.


Your Goal:  Turn the Cat Carrier into a Safe Place.

How:  

  • Leave the kennel out weeks prior to transporting your cat to the vet (or any car ride).
  • Better yet, leave the cat kennel out all the time; it looses its “fear factor”. Your cat will start to see it as neutral as the rest of the furniture.
  • Put your cat’s favorite treats, food, catnip, and toys in the crate to help  your cat associate the “scary kidnap machine” as a yummy, fun, safe place!
  • Play games around the cat carrier.
  • Place familiar scents (ones that you know your cat feels safe with) in the kennel. This can be a blanket, your sweater, their bedding, etc.
  • If the sound of the metal carrier door is a fear trigger for your cat, remove the door. You can put it back on after he/she is using as a kitty condo.

Your Goal: Reward Your Cat for Being Near the Carrier

How:

  • Reward your cat when s/he looks at the cat carrier.  Toss treats in her direction when she glances at it!
  • Have a Treat Party and praise her calmly when she walks near it.
  • Offer huge rewards if she peeks her head into the carrier.
  • It’s ok if your cat walks away. You are building up her confidence of just being near the carrier.

 

Your Goal:  Build Up to *Asking* Your Cat to Go Into the Carrier

How:

  • Reward your cat for walking in, then close the door for a few seconds. Open the door, toss treats, then walk away.  This teaches your cat that you’re not going to slam the door on him and CatNap him/her.
  • Gradually work up to keeping the door closed for longer periods.  Always reward your cat.
  • Your cat will learn that the door closing will open again soon.  This helps cats to feel safe, and not trapped.

Your Goal: Quick Trips

How: 

  • Once your cat is feeling safe at this point, and walking in and out of the carrier, you can carry her around the house, then let her out.
  • Remember to reward and praise!
  • Slowly build up to walking outside to the car with your cat in the carrier.  Keep it short and sweet.  Continue using lots of treats and praise.
  • At this stage, you don’t need to even turn on the car, just place the carrier inside the car, offer your cat treats, and see if she’s calm enough to eat.
  • After your cat is feeling comfortable and safe with this stage, you can turn on the car, offer treats, and then turn off the car and end the session.
  • Eventually you can work up to driving down the street, then coming right back home.
  • All of this will involve lots of treats, praise, and patience.

Your Goal:  Go Slow.  Be Patient.  Allow Choices.

How:

  • Cats respond well to slow and steady progress.
  • Cats respond positively to being given choices.
  • Choices create security, safety, and improve their well-being
  • Forcing cats to do anything only creates fear.
  • Fear creates distrust, anxiety, and even health problems.
  • Forcing your cat to do anything they are uncomfortable with breaks down your bond and erodes their trust.
  • Your cat is very sensitive to your energy. Be mindful of this!

Remember: Always ASK, REWARD, ENCOURAGE, and BE PATIENT!

You and your cat will make tremendous progress together, and create life long bonds if you can remember these 4 things.


Kitty Tip:  Easy-Traveler has also helped to transform car rides for our cats! I highly recommend it!

Spirit Essences helped Albert and the other cats to relax the entire 10 hour car ride!
Easy Traveler allowed Albert and the other cats to relax and fee safe the entire 10 hour car ride!


 Way down deep, we’re all motivated by the same urges. Cats have the courage to live by them. – Jim Davis

King Albert The Grey enjoying a much needed break out of his kennel to do manly cool cat things. This was at the 7 hour mark of our trip to our new home.
King Albert The Grey enjoying a much needed break out of his kennel to do manly cool cat things. This was at the 7 hour mark of our trip to our new home.

How have you transformed your cat-nappings to safe travels? Please share your tips with us!

Oh My Word! Baby Birds!

Life is as dear to a mute creature as it is to man. Just as one wants happiness and fears pain, just as one wants to live and not die, so do other creatures. – His Holiness The Dalai Lama

baby bird _house sparrow Newborn We recently moved into a new home. As with most moves, there are circumstances that you cannot control, and we have had our share this move.  Our landlord has been building on an addition to the house since before we moved in, and the construction still continues.  During all of the banging and vibrations, we discovered an active bird’s nest in the exterior wall.  We had been monitoring the nest for weeks, but this weekend we heard the wee cries of new hatchlings!

As exciting as this was, we knew that we had to make a decision quickly because the construction crew was scheduled to come the next day to seal up the exterior wall with insulation and drywall. The nest was going to be sealed in there with live baby birds! We put our heads together, identified the bird species, did some bird fact checking, and came up with the best solution for this species … We relocated the nest.


NOTE: Nesting songbirds are protected by federal law, which prohibits moving their nests!

In the United States it’s illegal to remove or destroy any active nest from any native bird species.  An active nest is defined as “a nest with eggs or brooding adults in it”.  If the nest has been abandoned or no eggs have yet been laid, it can be removed or destroyed as needed.

House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) and  European starlings, are not native birds. This is how we knew that it was legal to relocate the nest.

The images below show how we did it. I am sharing this to help others if they encounter a similar situation with native or nonnative bird species.

If you click on/scroll over the images above, you can see how and what we were doing.  Please note that this entire process happened very quickly, to reduce the amount of stress on the parents and the offspring.  After we moved the baby birds to the new nest area, we c l e a r e d ourselves out of the area, to allow the parents to feel safe enough to explore the area and listen for their offspring.

As we had hoped, Mother Nature and the maternal and paternal instincts saved the day! Just hours later, the cries of the hatchlings were heard and the parents found their offspring!  The mother and father are now guarding their recently relocated nest.

My husband holds the hatchling birds as I prepare a new, safer nest for them
My husband holds the very vulnerable hatchlings as I prepare a new, safer nest for them. Mom and dad watched us the entire time.


The next day we bought a bird feeder and offer them seed they prefer.

We found a very sturdy double seed bird feeder at Lowe's for $5!  I set it up in a tree that I often see the parents hanging out in. I also added some biodegradable nesting material; they have been using it already! yay!

We found a very sturdy double seed bird feeder at Lowe’s for $5! I set it up in a tree that I often see the parents hanging out in. I also added some biodegradable nesting material; they have been using it already! yay!

If you have found this article while searching for help on ‘how to move a bird’s nest’, or ‘how to help a baby bird’ it’s very important that you correctly identify the species of bird (by watching the adult birds at the nest), before you even consider interfering with the nest!  You must determine whether or not the nest removal would be legal according to local wildlife laws.  Native birds are protected species, so tampering with a nest could lead to hefty fines or other penalties.

Although often considered a nuisance species and an agricultural pest, the House Sparrow has proven well-suited for studies of general biological problems such as evolutionary mechanisms, temperature metabolism, and pest control.
Although often considered a nuisance species and an agricultural pest, the House Sparrow has proven well-suited for biological problems such as pest control.


Nests You Shouldn’t Remove

Somenestsshould not be removed regardless of the circumstances, unless wildlifeauthoritiesare consulted, or there are no other options to keep the nesting birds safe. These nests include:
  • Endangered birds that are unlikely to build a new nest if disturbed
  • Raptors or other large birds that will reuse the same nest for many years
  • Natural cavities that would be destroyed in order to remove the nest
  • Any nest in early summer that may be reused for additional broods
  • Learn more about rules regarding Relocating Nesting Birds

 

Bird Nest Facts:

  • Birds usually lay one egg a day.
  • They don’t begin incubating their eggs until all the eggs have been laid.
  • Clutch sizes vary from 2 to 8 eggs for most common backyard birds.
  • Once the last egg has been laid, incubation takes about two weeks.
  • The eggs will usually hatch about the same time.
  • After hatching, it will take another two weeks before the nestlings are ready to leave the nest.
  • To be on the safe side, and to allow for variety in species, allow six weeks before the nest is ready to be moved.
  • Learn more about incubation and fledging time for common bird species in North America.
  • Common questions about Baby Birds

 


What About Touching The Babies?!?

You’re probably familiar with the “rule” that many of us were taught as children: never touch baby birds, or the mother bird will reject her own offspring.  Unfortunately, it’s still generally believed that the mere scent of a human on a hatchling or fledgling bird will spook the mother bird into abandoning her offspring.  Good thing this misperception is FALSE!  This lore may have been invented for keeping children away from birds, in order to ensure the bird’s safety. Also, the parents of the baby bird may be nearby, and could become protective and aggressive when they see children near their nest; parents could have been protecting their human offspring with this tall tale. In fact, birds have a limited sense of smell and even if the mama bird could smell your scent, this would not interfere with taking care of her offspring.   However, if you disturb the eggs in a nest, the mother and father birds could understand that they are facing a danger, and may abandon the nest completely. So please give nesting birds the space they need!

Please help the birds and ignore those crazy myths!

Mother birds will not reject their babies because they smell human scent on them, nor will they refuse to set on eggs that have been handled by a person. Most birds have a limited sense of smell and cannot detect human scent. (If you handle bird eggs while the mother is away from the nest, mama bird will usually notice upon her return that the eggs were disturbed during her absence, and some species of bird will take this as an indication that a dangerous intruder is present and may temporarily or even permanently abandon their nests as a result. Such behavior is relatively rare, however, and in these situations the mother birds are reacting to visual warnings, not olfactory ones.)

 

Learn the Truth Behind More BIRD MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS!


So what should you do if you find a baby bird out of the nest? These graphics should help you!

baby bird out of nest help


found a baby bird

Learn more about What To Do If You Find A Baby Bird


If you have men who will exclude any of God’s creatures from the shelter of compassion and pity, you will have men who will deal likewise with their fellow men. – St. Francis of Assisi

 


Sources:

http://www.worldbirdsanctuary.org/index.php http://www.allaboutbirds.org/ http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna