Thank Them for Showing Up

bonding with your dog

He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader.  He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart.  You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion. ~ Unknown Author

Last night while most of the world watched the Olympics, I was wide-eyed, giddy, and on the edge of my seat watching the Westminster’s Masters Agility Championship live from New York.  Yeah, I know, it sounds riveting. Let me explain.

For the first time in its 138-year history, the famous Westminster Kennel Club allowed mixed-breed dogs to compete in a brand new competition called the Masters Agility Championship. For nearly 140 years, the Westminster Kennel Club has closed its doors to mixed breeds, known as “All American dogs”, focusing only on the conformation, physical abilities, and skill of only purebred dogs.  This inclusion allowed dog guardians from all over the world to show that everyday dogs can go nose-to-nose with their purebred peers.

I, along with many others felt that this was a huge step in the right direction of celebrating and recognizing all dogs, regardless of their pedigree.  Many of these high-spirited, high energy dogs are all too often dropped off at shelters by people who just don’t know how to deal with their energy and enthusiasm. So it really was such a joy and pleasure to see the All American Dogs go paw to paw with the purebreds.

Reese, a four year young Papillon from North Carolina, is a great example of what this new sort of competition means. Reese was surrendered to a rescue organization as a puppy because his original owner thought he had too much energy. His new owner is an X-ray technician who doubles as Reese’s handler.  They found a way to channel his energy by working with a qualified trainer, and Reese now competes in trials about twice a month.  He even became a bit of a celebrity last week when The Charlotte Observer published an article about his appearance at Westminster.  Another “All American Dog” named Emma is one more example of an incredible but true, underdog success story. Emma went from doggie death row to Westminster row!  Emma was abandoned, found and taken to a 48 hour high-kill shelter, rescued, and then three years later, Emma was chosen to compete at Westminster!

As cool as all of that is, something else really moved me. Even with all the pressures of being at the very first Westminster agility championship, and being live on international television, the handlers (trainers of the dogs) praised the heck out of their dog at the end of each agility run, no matter how well or how poorly their dog did.  Even if the dog stopped on the course, refused an obstacle, or performed less than desirable in any way, the handler treated the dog as if they had won best in show. It moved me to tears to see that kind of love, loyalty, and support from a dog trainer toward their beloved canine companion while under such pressure.

Let’s back up here for a bit so you can really understand why this is So Huge, and such an act of love and devotion.  These expert handlers and dogs practice for hours on end, for weeks and months at a time to perfect these obstacles on the agility course.  Many have been practicing agility training for decades, and some for only a few years.  Regardless of how long they have been working together to master the obstacle course, they train day in and day out to get it right.  The handlers and dogs go through rigorous (but fun) training to get to where they are so they can compete with the best of the best at the Westminster Agility Trials.  About 225 dogs, including 15 mixed breeds, were entered in Saturday’s agility drills.  They are given a map of the course to review (the people, not the dogs) and then they are expected to perform at their very best, having never run on this course before.  Yesterday each dog and their handler took the ring twice for qualifying rounds, with the best performers moving to the championship round. The dogs, representing 63 breeds from 23 states, were randomly selected from a pool of 653 entrants. Eventually they are narrowed down to 50, and then as more are eliminated, the best of the best get their Game On.

Our dog, Hocus Pocus, and I are very new to the agility world. We started agility training in September of last year.  I had no idea the bond that it would create between us, how much we would both love doing it, how amazing of a team we were together, and how additive it is!  Once a week for an hour and a half we were both pushed to the max both physically and mentally. I always knew that training can be stressful for all animals, but during our agility training together is when I really started to understand and appreciate the phrase “learning can be very stressful” for you and the animal that you are training.

So when I watched the agility trails last night I was so amazed when I saw the love, pride, and joy in the faces of the handlers after the dogs finished the course, no matter how poorly or well they or their dogs did.  They weren’t frustrated or angry. They were genuinely proud of the dog and they celebrated their dog’s success of just showing up and trying their best!  They didn’t get mad or frustrated with themselves or the dog for making mistakes! They went with whatever happened, and not only accepted it, but also celebrated at the end, no matter what it meant! I was amazed at how genuinely happy they were and how much they lavished their dog with love and praise, even when the dog or the handler totally screwed up! It was a tough course and one that really challenged some of the best agility dogs in the world, but the dogs and trainers showed up and gave it 110 percent.

I could see this happening and I appreciated it because I knew the feeling. I knew what it was like to try so hard and want yourself and your dog to succeed. Every night that Hocus and I went to agility I was nervous. I wanted to have my timing right for her, because she is a wicked fast learner, so I knew that if I was tired or distracted, her results would suffer because of me.  Before we went into class I would affirm that I wasn’t going to forget the cues, and I was going to do it right this time, for her. But the most important thing that I would remember was to say to her, “No matter what happens tonight I am so proud of you. You make me so proud every day. I love you. Now let’s go have some fun.”

Last night while watching the Westminster Agility Championship I was so moved to see every one of the remaining competitors give their dog the same love and respect that I gave to Hocus before every practice session.  I really hadn’t expected to see that.at a world famous competetion.   I figured that if I could be stressed and nervous before agility practice with no one there, they had to be out of their minds stressed beyond belief!  I know that the handlers were stressed, anxious, and nervous. I know those dogs felt their anxiety, nervousness, and tension, but they ran the difficult and complicated course, accepted the mishaps and mistakes, and still celebrated their dog at the end. It was truly amazing.

This is what competition is all about. Showing up, having fun, accepting the results, and praising your partner!  It’s not about the outcome, the finish line, the well behaved moments, the perfect timing, the correct cues and behaviors. It’s about the connection you have together. It’s about them trying. It’s about you trying. It’s about knowing you can lose, but giving 100 percent anyway. It’s about the bond you are strengthening. It’s about just showing up.  That’s all that either of you have to do; just show up. Smile. Breathe. Just get out there. Have fun with your dog.  Because that’s all your dog wants from you. And thank them for just showing up.

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Purebred and mixed-breed dogs show off their grace and skills in the Westminster Kennel Club’s first agility competition.  Handlers raced against the clock while directing their dogs through a complicated obstacle course with tunnels, jumps, weave poles, teeter-totters, A-frames and dog walks.  Instead of being judged on appearance and temperament, they earn points for their speed, jumps, and turns through the obstacles.  

You can view some footage of the day trials in the video below. 

 

Note: This video was not footage of the final agility contestants. Video of the finals was on FOX Sports 1 last night. It was an incredible LIVE premiere of the Masters Agility Championship at Westminster in New York.  If you missed it, check your local listings as it’s scheduled to replay again a few times this week! It was amazing!

Agility, particularly is exciting for spectators and for the dogs themselves, as that it’s a race over a number of obstacles and it gets great fan support and, in fact, is the fastest growing area of the dog world in terms of events. ~ Sean McCarthy, President, Westminster Kennel Club

“You don’t have to spend thousands of dollars on a dog for it to surpass your wildest dreams.”

If you want to learn more about the Westminster Dog Agility Championship trials, you can:

  • Follow them on Facebook here
  • Visit their website here:
  • See pics on their Instagram page here.
Hocus Pocus and me at Agility Training here in NC
Hocus Pocus and me at agility training here in NC

Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole. ~Roger Caras

In Gratitude

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Thanksgiving has come and gone.  This American holiday is the one day of the year that people consciously choose to reflect on what they are grateful for in their lives.  It is a time for reflection.  Our hearts are open to giving thanks for the many blessings we have, the family and friends that we share our lives with, and the variety of gifts that life has provided for us.  But this doesn’t have to be a once-a-year occurrence; we can live in gratitude every day.

As the world shows its more chaotic side these days, I have become infinitely grateful for gifts that I took for granted for most of my life.  These gifts are my animal companions.  Some are no longer with me, but thankfully, some are still by my side.  Every day I make a point to thank them for being in my life.  I have come to realize that many of my life lessons have come from them.  Each animal – past and present – reptile, bird, mammal, and amphibian, each taught me valuable lessons over the years; I could not have learned some of my greatest lessons without them.

They show me how to be fully present.  How to not fear or worry about the future, and how to not dwell on the past.  The here-and-now is their only time zone.  If I had the courage to live every moment as they do, I would enjoy and appreciate every second of this life.

From observing them, I have learned how to enjoy a sunset, a sunrise, a cool breeze, or a warm ray of sun on my face without having to discuss it, or capture it on film.

They taught me to take risks and be bold.  They have shown me how to look ahead and see life as an adventure.  They taught me to travel far and reach for what your heart desires.

They remind me that material things are meaningless.  So what if a glass or dish breaks?  So what if my favorite book was destroyed?  It’s only stuff.  It can be replaced.  The ones we love cannot be replaced.

They have made me a better human.  They have made me more understanding, and more compassionate.  I may even be a better mother to a human one day because of them.  They teach me patience.  They teach me true forgiveness.  They teach me to take time to grieve, then to move forward and not look back.  They teach me how to celebrate the passing of a loved one, and to not mourn the loss.  They teach me how to love unconditionally, and how to accept love.

They have taught me that being unapologetically myself is the only way to be.  They taught me to never shrink or hide who I really am to make others feel comfortable. They teach me to love and accept everything about myself.  They have shown me that guilt and suffering are wasted emotions.

They are never in a bad mood, even when they have every right to be.  They are always ready to move on and seize the next adventure.  When my life seems to be in a rough patch, I can shift my attention to my animal companions and see the joy, cheer and Light within them.  They are continuous examples of how to forgive, how to move on, and how to shake it off.  Their very nature is love.  Their presence alone is reassuring and comforting.  I am never truly alone with my animal companion by my side.

How can we repay someone who gives us these invaluable gifts every day?  With gratitude. Every day.

I encourage you to take a few minutes each day and give your animal companion something meaningful.  You can give your time, your undivided attention, or your affection.  After everything they bring into our lives, shouldn’t we find a way to show our gratitude to them?  They chose you.  You may have “found” them but they were always meant to be with you.  Just you.

 

They will always be there for you.  Thank them for that.

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The animal shall not be measured by man.  In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with extension of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear.  They are not brethren; they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of the earth.

~ Henry Beston



Take a moment to watch this touching short film to see how one man created a marvelous way to show gratitude for his feline buddy.  

Simple Acts of Kindness

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Three things in human life are important: the first is to be kind; the second is to be kind; and the third is to be kind. ― Henry James

So they say that today is World Kindness Day.  There’s a day for everything these days, so why not kindness?  It seems to be in short supply but in high demand around the world, so I am glad to see this day being celebrated.

Kindness is defined as “the quality or state of being kind” and “a kind act”.  Sounds pretty simple, right? Well if it’s so simple, why aren’t we doing this every day of the year?Kindness

I have a secret that I have kept to myself, but since it’s World Kindness Day, I feel like I can share it with you.  Who knows, maybe it will spread like wildfire.  Every so often (when I remember to do it) I will pay for the person’s order in line behind me when I go through the drive though our local coffee place.  I never know what they’re going to get, and I don’t worry about if it’s going to be expensive. And cool enough – it never is.  It’s always within my means.

(I have thought about how cool it would be to pay it forward at the grocery store as well, but then I laugh about the chance of offering to pay for the person in line behind me, and rather than picking up the tab for a dude and his 6 pack of beer, chips and dip, I get the lady with $300 worth of groceries.)

Ok, so back to the secret paying it forward game that I do … I have to say that the best part of paying it forward with any random act of kindness is that I usually do it when I am in a super craptastic mood.  You would think that would be the last moment when you would want to do something for someone else, but you would be surprised. It’s pretty remarkable how helping another person and sending a little love their way when you are feeling down will brighten your mood, knowing that you might have put a smile on someone’s face, or created a warm place in their heart.

A few weeks ago one of my best friends made a fun, colorful shirt that read “FREE HUGS” then went out to her local mall and approached strangers. She challenged herself and made herself vulnerable, but it totally paid off. People loved her hugs and she made so many people smile!

One of my best buddies out at her local shopping area spreading love and kindness!
One of my best buddies out at her local shopping area spreading love and kindness!

There are so many ways that we can spread kindness and cheer.  And we can do this 356 days out of the year.  Do it when your heart is sad. Do it when you are frustrated or annoyed.  Do it when you are in the best mood.  Just do it.  Spread love and kindness in any way that you can think of.  And if you can’t think of ideas, here are a few to choose from. And here are a few ideas for the kids out there.

Kindness is a language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see. ― Mark Twain

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In the video below, they track one act of kindness as it’s passed from one person to another. Eventually this one act of kindness boomerangs back to the person who set it in motion:

Kindness in words creates confidence. Kindness in thinking creates profoundness. Kindness in giving creates love. ― Lao Tzu

No matter where you are in the world today, it’s your day to change the world with one simple act of kindness. Heck, shoot for a dozen ways to spread kindness. The ripple effects will reach far beyond your wildest dreams!

What random acts of kindness do you enjoy sharing?  Please share in the comments below!  Then pass on the love!

acts of doing good and kindness

 

If we all do one random act of kindness daily, we just might set the world in the right direction. – Martin Kornfeld

Those On the Journey with Us

Those who make the journey with us

You only have to look around at your soul companions, who are making this journey with you, to realize how blessed you are.

Fall Leaves Frenzy!

All animals, except man, know that the principal business of life is to enjoy it. ~ Samuel Butler

The Passion of a Little Girl

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The year is 1979.  The town is Wichita, Kansas.  I am three years old.  Playing outside is one of my favorite things, but playing with friends outside is even better.

Samson and Sheba are my favorite friends. They are beautiful. Samson’s hair is light blonde like mine. It’s wavy, but gets really curly when wet.  Sheba’s hair is short, sleek, shiny, and black.

They are my very best friends in the whole wide world.  We do everything together.  We play.  We laugh.  We explore.  We run.  We nap.  Sammy even lets me have piggybacks on him and Sheba offers me an endless supply of kisses.  I love them.  And I love my life.


Life seemed so simple at that age.  Playing outside for hours on end and getting dirty with friends was it for me.  I loved my best friends more than anything.  And they loved me. They were mine. They were loyal.

They were dogs.

Sammy (that’s Samson’s nickname) was a golden retriever and shepherd mix.  Sheba was a black lab.  Sheba was calm, reserved, and regal.  Sammy was goofy, happy, and always smiling.  They both exuded love, and of course, slobber and kisses.

My mother rescued them when they were only a few weeks old.  You could fit each one in the palm of your hand.  They were part of our family, but strictly “outside” dogs – a concept that seems so strange and foreign to me now.

Sammy and Sheba ruled the back yard.  I remember the path along the fence line of our yard that Sammy had created from casing the perimeter of the yard multiple times a day, wearing down the grass to what eventually looked like trails.  Sammy was our protector.  Sheba was our soulful girl.

Playing with my best friends in our backyard was heaven.  We would play for hours.  They were always one step in front of or behind me, always watching out for me.  I would crawl into their simple but sturdy wooden dog houses that my father had built.  Once I had squeezed my way into their house they would come in after me, excitedly licking my face then squishing me with their massive, warm, furry bodies.  We would sit there until I was too hot or had enough and was ready to get out.  Then we would run and chase, play and hug, and get dirty some more.

They were my family.

We communicated with each other as if they were my real brothers and sisters.  I knew how they felt. I understood what they wanted, and they did the same for me.  There was true peace and happiness being in the presence of those two animals.

That was bliss to me.  Still today, when I am running, playing, or find myself covered in soil, hair, feathers, scales, or slobber I am happy and at peace.  Being with animals is one of the greatest enjoyments on Earth for me.  And yet, somehow, even at three years of age, I knew that I wanted to experience that happiness and connection with animals  for the rest of my life.

Nearly 37 years later this is still true.  Even looking at the picture of my two best furry friends from childhood brings me to tears. That was joy.


Animals of all shapes and sizes have been one of the greatest joys in my life from the moment I came into this world.  As early as I can remember when I was asked, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”  My answer was emphatically, “A veterinarian!”  To me, a veterinarian was someone who helps and heals animals. I just knew that I wanted to be like that.

Well, three decades later I am still someone who helps and heals animals.  Whether it’s an insect, a dog, or frog, animals have always been on the receiving end of my assistance. All species of life are near and dear to me; I have never seen them as lesser than me; they have always been my equal.  But I have noticed that the roles have changed a bit nearly forty years later.

They are all helping and healing me.

The passion I had at three years of age has taken many forms throughout my life, from exploring vet school, completing a degree in Wildlife Management, working in nature centers, a highly accredited zoo, and beyond. I accomplished that little girl’s dream, but I still have many more dreams to fulfill with animals and nature.

I think back to being a little girl.   I had no fears.   I was filled with a sense of adventure, exploration, and complete adoration of the animals of the land, sea and sky.   That fire was ignited as a child and it will always be in me.

I am still on that mission.


I have created this blog to explore the many adventures, mishaps, and lessons that I have learned from my animal companions (and nature) and to share them with others.  By doing so, I hope to help others better understand their animal companions and improve their relationships with them.  I also hope to help other Empaths better understand the delicate balance that we need, and how animals and nature can in fact, help us heal and grow in ways we never expected.

There is always more to learn and explore and many adventures to be had.

But for now, I think I’ll go outside and get dirty with my dog.

Summer of 1979 with Samson and Sheba ~ my two best friends

 

Dogs are our link to paradise. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring — it was peace. ― Milan Kundera

 

 



 

Safety Note:  Riding on dogs and smothering them with hugs is not in a child’s (or dog’s) best interest.  Fortunately, Sammy and Sheba were very patient, accommodating, and inviting with the way I showed them affection.  As you can see, Sheba’s moth is open – a behavior indicating she is at ease with me leaning on her.

But most dogs are not this tolerant.

Today I teach workshops on how to safely and respectfully show our canine companions affection without compromising their stress levels or a child’s safety.

If you are interested in learning more about canine body language, please visit these links:  here and  here  and here .  And I invite you to learn about dog and child safety here.


 

“Dogs are not our whole lives, but they make our lives whole”– Roger Caras