Thank you.

“The roots of all goodness lie in the soil of appreciation for goodness.” –Dalai Lama

thank you

This is a shout-out to you.  A huge, sincere thank you to you.

Today is all about you.

It’s National Pet Parent Day!  Yep.  I have to admit that I laughed when I realized this and thought, “Every day is pet parent day in our home! I don’t take a day off.”

There seems to be a worldwide or national day for everything these days, but today is a good day to celebrate.  Today is a worthwhile day to recognize because it’s all about honoring everything that we do as devoted animal guardians.   Whether you are a pet parent at home, an animal care taker at a shelter, zoo, or aquarium, or whether you are a trainer, behaviorist, veterinarian, or energy healer, you deserve thanks.  No matter what our exact role is, we all need to hear thanks.  No matter how we serve them, we all need to feel appreciated for all that we do for them.


How This Day Was Created

National Pet Parents Day was created to “honor all dedicated pet parents across the nation with a special day of their own.”  This date was founded by Veterinary Pet Insurance (VPI) in 2007. And although National Pet Parents Day is an unofficial holiday, it was created out of the inspiration of realizing that the majority of their insurance policyholders consider their pets to be part of their true family.     If you are following this blog, then you (like our family) see your “pets” as animal family members.  They may not be related to us by blood, but they are f a m i l y.



“Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others.” -Cicero


We Aren’t Always Living On Easy Street.

If you are a professional animal caretaker, or a professional pet consultant, people may see you and think you have the coolest job in the world.  If you have beautiful pets people may envy you.  They may assume your life is perfect with them.   If their rescue story melts their hearts they may want to rescue one, too.  And they assume that your animal companion’s rescue story ended when you invited them into your home.

If you are an animal behavior consultant, an animal trainer, an animal communicator, or an animal healer, people might assume you have “perfect pets.”  They assume that these pets are never sick, never wild and crazy, they never backslide, and they are all perfectly trained, and never misbehave.  You must be the envy of the world if you are one of these people with one of these pets!

Ah, but we know the truth.

We all know that life is not always easy-going with the animals we care for and share our homes with.  We know that some days there seem to be constant challenges.  We know what it feels like to want to cry or scream when we are at our wit’s end.  We know all too well how hard it can be to juggle a busy work and a family life with a pet-family lifestyle.

We know what it means to have our own physical challenges while living and working with animals who have their own challenges.  We know what it’s like to be a new parent struggling with a new baby while trying to manage your pet “kids” as well.  We know what it means to have a crawling toddler and a conflicted canine.  We know that a rescued animal’s rescue story really only begins the moment that we bring them into our human environment.  We know that there is never a “cure” for every behavioral issue.  We know the real meaning of patience.  We understand what it means to rearrange our lifestyle to ensure that our animal companions feel safe and secure.  We know the meaning of selflessness and sacrifice.  We know and understand that there are a myriad of challenges that we encounter with every animal that we care for.  We know that we have invited these animals into our lives and we are bound to them for the rest of their life.  We know that life with animal companions can be a blessing beyond words, but it can also be wrought with unexpected trials and circumstances.

But we also know that we never give up. Ever.

We are dedicated to them all.  We believe in what can happen when we are armed with knowledge.  We know how far we can go together with love and compassion.  We know that healing is possible.  We know that there are solutions that can be found.  We know that together we can create miracles.  We know that we will find a way to succeed with them. We know that they might never know all that we have done and will continue to do for them. But we do it all anyway. We do it with love and devotion.

And our lives will never be the same.

We know this truth.

We live it every day.


A Thousand Thanks

I have taken a break from writing blog posts to continue my focus on writing a few books in the works, and to prepare for an upcoming move to the west coast.  But when I felt into what today represented, I was inspired and really wanted to take a moment to write to you.

Thank YOU for being a true and loyal Conscious Companion. I know it’s not always easy.

★Thank you for never giving up on them.
★Thank you for allowing them teach you.
★Thank you for being open to new ideas.

★Thank you for being willing to implement something new every day.

★Thank you for learning how to speak their language.
★Thank you for learning how to listen to them.
★Thank you for accepting challenges as they arise.
★Thank you for helping them to become well-adjusted to your human world.
★Thank you for helping them to age with grace and ease.
★Thank you for knowing when it’s time to let them go.
★Thank you for loving them with all of your heart.

Thank you ALL for being dedicated, determined, and downright amazing!

I am graciously sending you and yours my love and gratitude.


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“Bᴇɪɴɢ ᴀ ᴘᴇᴛ ᴘᴀʀᴇɴᴛ ᴄᴀɴ ʙᴇ ᴏɴᴇ ᴏғ ᴛʜᴇ ᴍᴏsᴛ ᴄʜᴀʟʟᴇɴɢɪɴɢ ʀᴏʟᴇs ᴡᴇ ᴇᴠᴇʀ ᴄʜᴏᴏsᴇ, ʙᴜᴛ ɪɴ ᴇxᴄʜᴀɴɢᴇ ᴡᴇ ʟᴇᴀʀɴ ᴛʜᴇ ʀᴇᴀʟ ᴍᴇᴀɴɪnɴɢ ᴏғ sᴇʟғʟᴇssɴᴇss, ᴀᴄᴄᴇᴘᴛᴀɴᴄᴇ, ᴀɴᴅ ᴜɴᴄᴏɴᴅɪᴛɪᴏɴᴀʟ ʟᴏᴠᴇ.” – Amy Martin

A Day Dedicated To Horses Everywhere

December 13, 2013

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A dog may be man’s best friend, but the horse wrote history. ~Author Unknown

There seems to be a national day for everything, and today is one day of recognition that I wanted to bring light to and celebrate with you!  Today is the National Day of the Horse.

Horses have been thundering across the Earth’s landscape for more than 55 million years — much longer than the human species has existed.  Once man and horse met, our two species became powerfully linked. Throughout history man has depended on the horse.  The horse profoundly changed the ways we travel, work, fight wars and play.

Humans domesticated horses some 6,000 years ago, and over time, we have created more than 200 breeds, from the powerful Clydesdale to the graceful Arabian. As we have shaped horses to suit our needs on battlefields, farms, and elsewhere, these animals have shaped human history. They have also captured our imagination and hearts. Millions of people rely on horses as their spirited, dedicated, much adored companions. ~ American Museum of Natural History

Not only have we utilized horses for what they have to offer, but humanity has learned to appreciate horses for what they embody: freedom, spirit, adventure, perseverance, independence and drive.  Horses are gentle and loyal, but fierce and strong.  They are friends and companions to many humans and animals. They can be the ultimate travel companion for guardians who are willing to go the distance with them.

For all of these reasons and more, Congress designated December 13 as National Day of the Horse.  The text of the resolution states:

Encouraging citizens to be mindful of the contribution of horses to the economy, history, and character of the United States and expressing the sense of Congress that a National Day of the Horse should be established.

Whereas the horse is a living link to the history of the United States;

Whereas, without horses, the economy, history, and character of the United States would be profoundly different;

Whereas horses continue to permeate the society of the United States, as witnessed on movie screens, on open land, and in our own backyards;

Whereas horses are a vital part of the collective experience of the United States and deserve protection and compassion;

Whereas, because of increasing pressure from modern society, wild and domestic horses rely on humans for adequate food, water, and shelter; and

Whereas the Congressional Horse Caucus estimates that the horse industry contributes well over $100,000,000,000 each year to the economy of the United States: Now, therefore, be it Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That Congress–

(1) encourages all citizens to be mindful of the contribution of horses to the economy, history, and character of the United States;

(2) expresses its sense that a National Day of the Horse should be established in recognition of the importance of horses to the Nation’s security, economy, recreation, and heritage; and

(3) urges the President to issue a proclamation calling on the people of the United States and interested organizations to observe National Day of the Horse with appropriate programs and activities.

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The essential joy of being with horses is that it brings us in contact with the rare elements of grace, beauty, spirit, and fire.  ~Sharon Ralls Lemon

According to the American Horse Council:

  • There are 9.2 million horses in the United States.
  • 4.6 million Americans are involved in the industry as horse owners, service providers, employees and volunteers.
  • 2 million people are horse guardians.
  • The horse industry has an economic effect on the U.S.of $39 billion annually.
  • The industry has a $102 billion impact on the U.S.economy when spending by industry suppliers and employees is factored in.
  • The horse industry provides 460,000 full-time jobs.

No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle. 

~Winston Churchill

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Equine Facts

  • The horse evolved 55 million years ago.
  • A close, early relative of the horse is Hyracotherium, also known as an eohippus. It was the size of a large fox. Hyracotherium stood 10 inches high at its shoulders and had four toes on its front feet and three on its back.
  • The only surviving branch of the horse family is the genus Equus, which includes zebras, asses, and donkeys along with the horse.
    Perissodactyla means “odd toed” and rhinos and tapirs belong to this order as well as horses.
  • The Equidae family consists of horses, asses and zebras and there are 9 species within this genus and the domestic horse or pony is “Equus caballus”.
  • The Equidae family have a mane, 40-42 teeth, and skulls with long nasal bones. They are herd animals and fast runners preferring to flee from danger rather than face it. The Equidae family are herbivores.
  • Rhinoceroses and tapirs are the horse’s closest living relatives.

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  • Science shows us that the first domesticated horses were probably kept primarily as a source of food, rather than for work or for riding.
  • A horse can rest and even doze while standing. A horse will lock one of its hind legs at the stifle joint (it’s basically the knee). A group of ligaments and tendons called the stay apparatus holds the leg in place with minimal muscle involvement. Horses will switch from leg to leg to prevent fatigue in the leg that is locked.
  • A female horse is called a mare. A male horse is called a stallion. In the wild, the mare decides when the herd moves on and usually only one stallion will stay with a herd.
  • Horses live in well-structured groups with clear followers and leaders. Without any human training, horses will line up behind a lead mare according to their rank in the herd, usually with a stallion guarding the rear.
  • The famous mustangs of the American West, like many other “wild” populations, are actually considered feral, descended from escaped domesticated horses. The only truly wild horses live in Mongolia. They are called the Przewalski.
  • The Przewalski horse went extinct in the wild but was reintroduced at the Seer Horse Reserve in Gobi Desert, Mongolia. These horses have managed to make an impressive comeback and their success is due in large part to the social structure of their herd. You can view some of their story in this video:  The Wild Horses That Beat Extinction

You can discover more about these incredible Equines here: Equus “Story of the Horse”



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A dog looks up to a man, A cat looks down on a man,  But a patient horse looks a man in the eye and sees him as an equal. 
– Unknown


Sources:

American Museum of Natural History

http://www.reisranch.com/

http://www.horsechannel.com/

http://www.habitatforhorses.org/national-day-of-the-horse/

http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/horse

Learn more fascinating facts about horses here!

Graphics created by Conscious Companion.